‘The Wolf of Dalriada’ – questions for the hive mind of a book club!

A number of readers have kindly suggested The Wolf of Dalriada to their book clubs. I thought a list of possible questions to start the discussions off might be helpful. So here are thirty. Don’t feel you have to do more than say 10-15. Avoid overkill! There is no exam or qualification involved! And some of the questions are literary; others are more related to personal development (and bibliotherapy!)

  1. Which three words describe how you feel, having finished ‘The Wolf of Dalriada’?
  2. Who is your favourite character and why?
  3. Who is/are the hero(es)? Who are the villains? And why?
  4. Do the characters change? (Remembering this is Part 1 of ‘The Wolf of Dalriada’ series.)
  5. Do you empathise with your favourite character or wish you were more like him/her?
  6. Which character would you most like to invite to dinner this evening and why? Who would you invite too? What would you hope to learn?
  7. If you were a casting director for a film/tv version, who would you cast?
  8. What moments in the novel do you like best?
  9. What moments do you like least?
  10. What is the most significant event for you in the story and why?
  11. What events puzzle you and why? What are other possible outcomes for these puzzling events?
  12. Could you lose yourself in the world of ‘The Wolf of Dalriada’?
  13. Is there an important theme (or themes) that this story illustrates?
  14. What is the role of superstition and tradition in this story?
  15. What did you learn about change and social classes in this book?
  16. What is the predominant moral issue? Which character understands what is right here or does no-one?
  17. Are there other moral issues? What are they? Who understands what is involved?
  18. What are the ‘unanswered questions’? (Again remembering this is Part 1 of a series.)
  19. How would you describe the genre of this book, if any?
  20. Description involves the senses – sight, sound, smell, touch, taste. Is any one sense predominant in this book?
  21. Pretend you’re the author’s content editor. Have you noticed anything which is inaccurate or inconsistent?
  22. What does this tell you about the difference between fiction and non-fiction?
  23. What first drew you into the book? The blurb? The first sentence or paragraph? Why?
  24. Pretend you are writing a blurb for the cover of the book. What would you say?
    What would you tweet (in 140 characters) about this book?
  25. Does the book remind you of any other writers or novels you’ve read? What’s the same? What’s different?
  26. People say all fiction is autobiographical. If you were to guess at a formative experience in the author’s life based on what they’ve written in this book, what would you guess?
  27. What did ‘The Wolf of Dalriada’ speak to in your own life?
  28. What did you learn?
  29. Do you want to read Part 2? (You could sign up for the Author’s newsletter on this website.)
  30. Any other questions?
I should love it, too, if you would like to let me know your joint/several experiences of reading and discussing ‘The Wolf of Dalriada’. If so, please contact me through Comments (attached to this blog).
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About Elizabeth Gates

When I was four, I wrote my first story - mainly because no-one else had written the story I wanted to read. Later, with two degrees in English Language & Literature and Linguistics, I toured Europe as a creative writing tutor and then went on to work as a public health journalist for twenty-five years. Writing has always played a huge part in my life, coupled with history and travel. So my debut novel, The Wolf of Dalriada, seems a natural part of my progression through life. And when not writing, l like to spend time with my family and friends and the livestock that delights in trailing after me.